304 Hume Street Collingwood, ON 705-445-2281

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Dr. Shafiei & Dr. Sabernia

Complete Family & Sedation Dentistry

Complete and Removable Dentures

Dentures are artificial replacements for your natural teeth and gums. If an accident, a disease or poor oral health care has left you with only a few healthy teeth or none at all, your dentist or prosthodontist might suggest dentures to replace your missing teeth. There are 2 types of dentures: partial and complete. For both types of dentures your dentist or specialist makes a model of your teeth by taking impressions. The models are used to custom-make your dentures.

 

Types of Dentures

 

Partial Dentures

Partial dentures are also called “removable partial denture prostheses” or “partials.” They may be used when nearby teeth are not strong enough to hold a bridge, or when more than just a few teeth are missing. Partial dentures are made up of one or more artificial teeth held in place by clasps that fit onto nearby natural teeth. You can take the partial denture out yourself, for cleaning and at night.

 

Complete Dentures

Complete dentures are what we most often refer to as “false teeth.” They are also called “full dentures” and are used when all your natural teeth are missing. Complete dentures are removable as they are held in place by suction. They can cause soreness at first and take some time to get used to. There are 2 types of complete dentures: immediate dentures and conventional dentures.

 

Immediate Dentures

Immediate dentures are made before your teeth are removed. Your dentist takes measurements and makes models of your jaws during your first visit. Once your teeth are extracted, your dentist inserts the immediate dentures. The benefit of immediate dentures is that you are not without teeth during the healing period, which can take up to 6 months. During the healing period, your bones and gums can shrink and your immediate dentures may need to be relined by your dentist for a proper fit.

 

Conventional dentures are made and inserted into your mouth after your teeth have been extracted and the gums and jaw tissues have healed.

 

 

Implant Supported Dentures

 

Here in Collingwood, Ontario, Dr. Shafiei offers implant supported dentures which is a type of over denture that is supported by and attached to implants. This is by far the best way to support your denture to prevent problems such as eating issues, difficulties in speaking properly and loose or ill fitting dentures.
Dr. Shafiei also offers regular dentures which rest on the gums, and are not supported by implants.

 

Dr. Shafiei offers implant supported dentures when a patient doesn't have any teeth in their jaw, but has enough bone in their jaw to support a dental implant. There are two different ways to have the denture attached to the implants. First, a removable implant supported denture has special attachments that snap onto attachments on the implants. The alternative to the removable denture is fixed, where the implant supported denture is permanently fixed to the implants.

 

Implant supported dentures are usually made for the lower jaw because regular dentures tend to be less stable there. A regular denture made to fit an upper jaw is generally quite stable on its own and doesn't need the extra support offered by implants. However, you can receive an implant supported denture in either the upper or lower jaw.

 

You should remove a removable implant supported denture daily to clean the denture and gum area. Just as with regular dentures, you should not sleep with it at night. Some people prefer to have fixed (permanent) crown and bridgework in their mouths that can't be removed. Dr. Shafiei will consider your particular needs and preferences when suggesting fixed or removable options.

 

 

Caring for your Dentures

 

Complete and partial dentures need to be cleaned every day just like natural teeth. Otherwise, plaque and tartar can build up on your dentures and cause stains, bad breath and gum problems. Plaque from your dentures can also spread to your natural teeth and gums, causing gum disease and cavities.

 

To clean your dentures, remove them from your mouth and run them under water to rinse off any loose food particles. Then wet a denture brush or a regular soft-bristle toothbrush and apply denture cleaner or a mild soap. Household cleaners and regular toothpaste are too abrasive and should not be used for cleaning dentures. Gently brush all surfaces of the dentures including under the clasps where bacteria collect. Be careful not to damage the plastic or bend the attachments. Rinse your dentures well in clean water before placing them back in your mouth.

 

While your dentures are removed, be sure to clean and massage your gums. If your toothbrush hurts your gums, run it under warm water to make it softer or try using a finger wrapped in a clean, damp cloth. If you have partial dentures, brush your natural teeth with a soft-bristled toothbrush and floss.

 

Always remove your dentures overnight to give your mouth a chance to rest. Soak them in warm water with or without denture cleanser. If your dentures have metal clasps, only use warm water for soaking, as other soaking solutions can tarnish the metal. When you’re not wearing your dentures, keep them in water to stop them from drying out or warping. Never use hot water for soaking.

 

Dentures can break if dropped or squeezed too tightly. When you are handling your dentures, stand over a folded towel or a sink of water just in case you accidentally drop them.

 

Look for cracks in your dentures. If you find any, take them to your dentist or specialist for repair. See your dentist regularly and at least once a year. Your mouth is always changing, so your dentures will need adjusting or relining from time to time to make sure they fit well. Poorly fitted dentures may cause denture sores that make oral cancer more difficult to spot. At your dental exam, your dentist will also examine your gums for any signs of disease or oral cancer and any natural teeth you may have for signs of decay or infection.

 

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